Category Archives: Legalized usury

STOP #PRIVATEBANKS from printing #publicmoney as #publiccredit

This video was recorded when Martin Wolf, Chief Commentator at the Financial Times, addressed the Institute of Chartered Accountants of England and Wales and Positive Money.

Here’s one of his comments: Strip private banks of their power to create money.

In 2008 he published the book Fixing Global Finance.

His speech inspired me to send him this email:

Dear Mr Wolf

OPEN EMAIL Continue reading

OVERT MONETARY FINANCING or ‘Helicopter Money’ Policies – Lord Turner is waking up?


Anatole Kaletsky
writes about the 46-page speech that Lord Turner, Chairman of Britain’s Financial Services Authority gave at the Cass Business School on 6th February 2013.

Positive Money writes Adair Turner tumbles to the merits of a Positive Money idea.

In 2008, I had been advised by a human rights lawyer to ‘go for Parliamentary scrutiny via the Treasury Select Committee‘. Since the Treasury Select Committee had just announced their inquiry into climate change, we submitted Green Credit for Green Purposes.

Since 2002, Austin Mitchell MP has been tabling Early Day Motions to address exactly this: ‘overt monetary financing’ – but under a different label: public credit.

You can really tell from this speech how “the Religion of Money” has won over the Lost Science of Money, as men struggle with: whom to follow and whether to be for or against the ‘current consent’:-

  • a virtually surefire method of stimulating economy activity exists today and that politicians and central bankers can no longer treat it as taboo: ‘newly created money should be handed out to the citizens or governments;
  • distribute free money to end deep recessions;
  • quantitative easing for the people;
  • overt monetary financing (OMF) or “helicopter money” as ‘permanent monetisation of government debt and ‘extreme option’ in ‘extreme circumstances’.

Strangely, Lord Turner associates ‘inflationary risks’ and ‘printing money’ with Germany: the Bundesbank, Goethe’s Faust and the devil itself: Mephistopheles. Continue reading

A Matter of Life or Debt – Resolving the Economic and Ecological Crisis: a feisty book review

The book is called Against Usury and the author is Robert van de Weyer – an economics lecturer who became a priest. Of course: he resolves the economic and ecological crisis, as any critical thinker / writer could. But: it is also clear that the agenda of the global financial elite is NOT to solve any crisis, but to control people and resources. Hence we are experiencing spiritual, ethical and moral battles that underlie the crises that we perceive.

The review is a beautifully feisty critique of the system that the minority that calls itself ‘monetary reformers‘ has been analysing for decades.

May the magic of the web allow enough people to think up alternatives, while the usurious dragon of capitalism seems to try its very best to devour earth and its peoples…

Billions for the Bankers – Debts for the People

The Real Story of the Money-Control Over America is an article by Pastor Sheldon Emry (1926 – 1985). If you have trouble with the server of freedom domain, please try here.

It’s an excellent and bold text with the following titles:

  1. Money is Man’s only “Creation”
  2. Money “Creating” is profitable
  3. Adequate Money Supply is Needed
  4. The Bankers’ Depression of the 1930s
  5. Money for Peace? NO! Money for Wars? Yes!
  6. Power to Coin and Regulate Money
  7. How the People Lost Control to the Federal Reserve
  8. More Disastrous than Pearl Harbour
  9. They Print it – We Borrow it and Pay them Interest
  10. And there’s More
  11. And there’s Still More
  12. The Interest Amount is Never Created
  13. If $60,000 is borrowed,, £255,931.20 must be paid back (14%)
  14. Small Loans do the Same Thing
  15. This is why Bankers Prosper in Good Times or Bad
  16. The Cost to You: Evnetually, Everything!
  17. For the Gamblers among my Readers
  18. Yes, it’s Political, too!
  19. Mounting Debts and Wars
  20. And there’s More
  21. The Constitutional Way – Every Citizen a Stockholder
  22. No Banker’s Plunder
  23. Stable Money
  24. Citizen Control
  25. A Debt-Free America
  26. Why You Haven’t Known
  27. Controlled News and Information
  28. Tell the People
  29. Audit the Federal Reserve System?
  30. Why Haven’t they Told You?
  31. What some Famous Men have Said about the Money Question

An excellent read by a remarkable person!

Enforcement of Bank of England Act 1694

This Early Day Motion was tabled by our Chairman Austin Mitchell MP on April 20, 2009:

That this House, observing that the intention of the founding Act of the Bank of England in 1694 was `that their Majesties’ subjects may not be oppressed by the said corporation’, notes that those subjects have been seriously oppressed by the Bank’s failure to control the greed, risk-taking and speculation of the banking system over which it presides; and therefore suggests that this oppression should be dealt with as the Act provides by fines three times the value of the abusive trading.

Today the first three MPs have signed. Will you get your MP to sign via WriteToThem

In our observation, oppressions through banks are due to:

1. There is now only a limited number of qualified staff in every branch. In fact, what used to be professional training for a professional body, ACIB, has become a “School of Finance“.
2. The training in “banking” is limited. It consists only of “sales”.
3. There is now little responsibility in local branches.
4. Instead, all decision making has been centralised. This results in the decision makers having little personal knowledge of the client or a perspective about a business.
5. There is little comprehension of day-to-day business issues.
6. There is no realisation of the criticality of time or expediency.
7. There is limited knowledge of supposed Government support. As an example, the Small Firms Loan Guarantee Scheme (SFLGS) was reducing before the crisis.
8. Instead of joined-up thinking, staff are only box tickers and have no room for initiative.
9. MPs have very limited knowledge of the depth of the problems, even before the crisis.
10. Day-to-day business borrowing for “normal” clients has never been excessive. In fact, it was already very restrictive to Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs) and often even obstructive.